Angourie Rice

REVIEW: Every Day (2018)

Teenager Rhiannon (Angourie Rice) falls in love with “A” someone who wakes up in a different body each day and must live that person’s life for a day, not causing any lasting problems before they go to sleep and wake up in another person’s body.

Based on the contemporary YA novel of the same name by David Levithan, Every Day is a surprisingly sweet, thoughtful and touching film. The supernatural or fantasy nature of “A” is explained well, and through inhabiting numerous characters (and the young actors performances) you get to see what their personality is like as they slowly get Rhiannon to believe what happens them each day.

The young cast are all great, but Angourite Rice is just wonderful as Rhiannon. Rhiannon has the typical teenage boyfriend drama, but as she grows closer to “A” she becomes a more confident person that has always been open and kind. Rice’s presence lights up the screen, bringing the laughs with the comedic moments but also can put across the pain of loving someone who she doesn’t know if she’ll see them again.

The soundtrack is great and everything about this film is so soft. Both in terms of the story and the way the film is shot with soft lighting and idyllic settings, whether it’s a lake house or a beach, makes it seem like Every Day takes place at the beginning of summer and “A”’s and Rhiannon’s romance will never end.

Every Day tackles ideas of sexuality and love in a broad way but it’s a way that’s accessible to it’s target audience without being preachy. It also features discussions of mental health which is handled well, however there’s so much more this story could have done with race and class as “A” spends time in these different people’s bodies and lives.

Every Day is a sweet film that’s about loving a person for who they are, not what they appear like, and its young cast does a fine job showing the different kinds of relationships you can have while in high school. 4/5.

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REVIEW: The Nice Guys (2016)

the nice guys movie posterUnlicensed private detective Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe) is forced to team up with Holland March (Ryan Gosling), an unlucky private detective, when he needs to find a girl called Amelia (Margaret Qualley) the daughter of government official Judith Kuttner (Kim Basinger). Soon the mismatched pair realise they might be involved in a bigger and more dangerous case than either of them thought.

The Nice Guys is a lot of fun. This is mainly down to two things, the chemistry between Crowe and Gosling and the brilliant script. Healy and March really are a mismatched pair, they are so different but they work so well together and balance each other out. The script just highlights the chemistry between them. All the dialogue is witty and clever and there’s always some surprises.

Holly (Angourie Rice), Holland March’s daughter, treads the fine line between being overly-involved in the case and being smart and wise. Her character helps smooth out the rough edges of Healy and helps keep her dad on the right side of criminal.

As The Nice Guys is set in the 1970’s and is very much a noir film, there’s all the usual characters including femme fatales, conspiracies, thugs and there’s a lot of death and destruction. The Nice Guys revels in it all and even when the case itself is one of those that seems to get bigger and more convoluted as it goes along, in the end you realise that everything really is connected. Plus there’s still some great character moments in amongst all the laughs.

The Nice Guys is smart, hilarious and a little absurd but that just makes it even more brilliant. 5/5.