books

Women’s History Month TBR and the Indieathon TBR

This TBR post is basically going to be one big month-long TBR but a subset of these books will be relevant to my Indieathon TBR. March is Women’s History Month and because I became aware of this sooner rather than later, I plan to focus on reading books by women this month. Each year I read a pretty equal split between male and female authors, but I always find it interesting to take a proper look as to what’s on my shelves.

Also in March is the Indieathon, which is a week-long readathon where the aim is to read books from independent publishers. This readathon is hosted by Ninja Book Box and it runs from Friday 8th to Friday 15th March.

In this big TBR post there will be far more books than I could possibly read during a month (though saying that I am going to making some long train journeys for work this month so that’ll give me more reading time than normal) and I’ll note which books are from independent publishers so those are the ones I might read during the Indieathon.

I have many unread books that are written by women but not so many unread books that are from independent publishers but, surprisingly to me, most of the books on this TBR are indie books.

Burning Cities by Kai Aareleid (translated by Adam Cullen), published by Peter Owen Publishers.
Mere Chances by Veronika Simoniti (translated by Nada Grošelj), published by Dalkey Archive Press.
A Fortune Foretold by Agneta Pleijel (translated by Marlaine Delargy), published by Other Press.
Soviet Milk by Nora Ikstena (translated by Margita Gailitis), published by Peirene Press.
The Red Beach Hut by Lynn Michell, published by Linen Press
Feminists Don’t Wear Pink and other lies curated by Scarlett Curtis, published by Penguin
A Blade So Black by L.L. McKinney, published by Titan Books

The first four indie books on my TBR this month are all for my Read the World Project. I have, at my last count, 149 countries left to read so it’d be nice if this month could give me a push with my international reading.

Set in the Estonian city of Tartu, Burning Cities follows two generations of the Unger family from the Second World War to the twenty-first century. Mere Chances is a collection of short stories that are said to be strange and about characters who are struggling to maintain their identities. Soviet Milk is about the affects of Soviet rule on one person, how a woman strives to become a doctor but outside forces stop her and even deprive her of her relationship with her daughter. A Fortune Foretold is a coming of age story about a young girl in 1950s Sweden who uses fortune-telling and prophesies to make sense of the world around her. The last indie book on my TBR is one I received from Ninja Book Box’s Summer Reading box last year; The Red Beach Hut is about the friendship between an eight-year-old boy and a man who takes refuge in a red beach hut.

I’m not sure which indie books are the ones I’ll read during the Indieathon specifically, as I’ve said before I’m very much a mood reader, but these books are both from independent publishers and by women, so I hope to read them this month.

All the books mentioned so far feel like they are serious reads so I’ve also picked up Feminists Don’t Wear Pink and other lies it’s a collection of essays and writings from lots of different women from different walks of life, so it’s something I can deep in and out of easily. The last book on my ridiculously ambitious TBR is A Blade So Black. I thought it’d be a good idea to throw some YA in here and this is an urban fantasy story inspired by Alice in Wonderland and with a black protagonist.

These are all the books I’d like to read this month. Are you focussing on reading books by female authors this month? Or are you taking part in the Indieathon? There’s going to be Twitter chats and Instagram challenges so I hope they help me to keep on track. Whish me luck! If I read five of these books that’ll be good for me.

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Books of 2019

Here are all the books I read this year. I’m taking it a bit easier this year and haven’t signed up for any challenges. Instead I’m going to be focussing on my Read the World Project and trying to get my physical TBR down a fair bit. You can find out more about what I’m reading on my Twitter and Goodreads.

Without further ado, here’s what I read in 2019! Any titles with asterisks are rereads and if it has a link, that goes to my review.

January:
Butterfly: From Refugee to Olympian, My Story of Rescue, Hope and Triumph – Yusra Mardini
The Exact Opposite of Okay – Laura Steven
My Brilliant Friend – Elena Ferrante
Under the Tripoli Sky – Kamal Ben Hameda
Every Man Is A Race – Mia Couto

February:
– Made You Up – Francesca Zappia
The Memory of Love – Aminatta Forna
Allah is not Obliged – Ahmadou Kourouma
Safe as Houses – Simone van der Vlugt
– Let’s Talk About Love – Claire Kann
Crimson – Niviaq Korneliussen

March:
Burning Cities – Kai Aareleid
Soviet Milk – Nora Ikstena
– A Fortune Foretold – Agneta Pleijel
– Leah on the Offbeat – Becky Albertalli
– Secret Son – Laila Lalami
– Letters from Burma – Aung San Suu Kyi

Currently reading:
– ???

Books read: 17/52
Books reviewed: 11/26

My Reading in 2018 and Goals for 2019

Slightly later than usual (but it’s still the first half of January so it’s all good) but here’s where I look back on what and how I read in 2018 and my reading plans for 2019. In 2018 I read 72 books which beat my goal of 52 books and I reviewed 55 of them which was way better than my goal of reviewing 26 of them. You can find all the books I read here, and I posted my Top Ten books of 2018 earlier this month here.

I had a fair few reading challenges and goals for 2018 and I completed most of them. I continued to put £1 in a jar for every book I read so that gave me £72 to put in the bank at the end of the year which was a nice bonus. I continued with my Read the World Project and 31 of the books I read in 2018 were for that project.

I signed up for three reading challenges in 2018 because I love being overconfident! They were the Beat the Backlist Challenge which even though the majority of what I read was backlist, I’d always forget to put reviews on Amazon and/or link the reviews on the host’s site, so I didn’t really complete that challenge in that sense though I did surpass my target of 30 back list books. Then there was the A-Z Reading Challenge and the Monthly Motif Challenge – I completed both of those which I was really happy about.

I tried to get my TBR down to 50 books – I say “tried” but I’m not sure I really did. I acquired 53 books in 2018, from buying them myself, gifts or subscription boxes, and I read 28 of them. The other books I read were a mixture of books I owned pre-2018 and books from the library – I really embraced the library and borrowing audiobooks from there this year. I didn’t really get my TBR down at all; I started 2018 with 100 books on my TBR and finished it with 100 books on my TBR so at least it didn’t grow any bigger! It was a bit of a bummer though because looking at the numbers it did nothing about the unread books I own even though I did read a lot. Oh well! Maybe I’m destined to have piles of books around me!

It wasn’t a goal, but I do like to keep track of who’s writing what I’m writing. I always aim to have an equal split between male and female authors and I couldn’t have gotten a more even split in 2018 if I’d tried!

Now for my reading goals in 2019.

I’m keeping it super simple this year. I haven’t signed up for any reading challenges and I don’t plan to. I’m setting my reading goal at 52 books again and that I’ll review at least 26 of them. I think it’s good to at least set some achievable goals.

I’m going to continue to put £1 in a jar for every book I read as it’s a nice little financial boost at the end of the year, and I will once again aim to get down to 50 unread books on my TBR. It’s kind of a tradition at this point to say that so I might as well continue. It would be good if I could keep an equal split of male and female authors though I don’t mind if there’s more women authors as I do tend to read more books by women. Also, I’m thinking about tracking the split between white authors and authors of colour, I’d hope that at least 25% of the books I read are by non-white authors.

I think my main reading goal for 2019 is to focus on my Read the World Project. From the outset I wanted to read a book from every country in the world before I was 30. That’s in 2 years and 9 months-ish and I have about 150 countries left to read so I need to read about 50 books from around the world this year in order to make a dent. I own 14 books that are for this project and I’m definitely going to be getting more from the library, even in physical or audio form.

There’s my reading goals for 2019. Do you have any reading goals for the year? Or are you being a bit more relaxed about reading this year? I’d love to know about your reading goals and any tricks you might have to help achieve them.

BOOK BLOGGER HOP: If you could travel back in time to purchase the first printing of a specific novel, what book would that be?

It’s been a while (about a year to be honest) since I’ve last done one of these, but they are fun. The Book Blogger Hop is a weekly feature hosted by Coffee Addicted Writer, to find bookish blogs and to learn more about the bloggers themselves. You can find more info on the feature here.

This week’s question is: If you could travel back in time to purchase the first printing of a specific novel, what book would that be?

Now that’s a good question! I’m not too fussed about covers and editions (though I do prefer all books in a series to match) but, if I could, I think I’d want to get a first edition of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. It’s my favourite book in the trilogy and I think it would feel really special having that book sitting pride of place on my shelf.

Is there any book you’d want a first edition of?

Sci-Fi Month is here!

IMAGE CREDIT: PHOTO by Greg Rakozy on Unsplash. QUOTE from The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

November is Sci-Fi Month. I’ve seen talk about Sci-Fi Month on the twittersphere in previous years, but I’ve never been prepared enough to take part – this year is different though! Hosted by Dear Geek Place and imyril Sci-Fi Month is for celebrating all things sci-fi. That’s books, comics, films, TV shows – anything! It’s an excuse to catch up on the sci-fi things you’ve been meaning to get around to watching/reading and it’s a chance to meet fellow sci-fi fans.

There’s no requirements or goals to take part in Sci-Fi Month which I really like as sometimes too much pressure from challenges can put me off taking part. See imyril’s blog for more information on Sci-Fi Month and follow @SciFiMonth on Twitter and use the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth to take part in all the chats.

I had a look at my physical TBR, and I don’t actually have many sci-fi books on there. In fact, I just have four, Brilliance by Marcus Sakey, Dune by Frank Herbert, Area 51 by Bob Meyer, and The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers.

My two main bookish aims will be to read The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet (funnily enough a recent #NinjaBookSwap gift from Dear Geek Place) and Dune. There’s going to be a readalong of The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet during Sci-Fi Month which is always a helpful incentive – more info on the readalong is here. I have a physical copy of Dune but as that’s huge and intimidating, I used one of my Audible credits to purchase the audiobook. It’s a long audiobook at 21 hours but I should be able to listen to and complete it during the month on my walk to and from work every day (generally I can listen to at least an hour of an audiobook each working day).

When it comes to films, I’m going to make watching sci-fi films a priority in November. I really like science-fiction films, I like how they can be futuristic or bleak, can be action-packed or more thoughtful. There are so many subgenres of science-fiction which means there’s so many different stories to tell.

I’ve had a look through my watchlists on both Netflix and Amazon Prime and here’s just some of the sci-fi film I’d saved: The Discovery, Next Gen, The Beyond, Mute, Hardcore Henry, Arq, The Zero Theorem, Gattaca, Approaching the Unknown, The Colony, Psychokinesis, Stasis, Advantageous, Beyond, and Guardians. (Yes, there’s a film called Beyond and a different film called The Beyond – one’s on Netflix and the other’s on Prime and I’m intrigued)

Some of these have been on my watch list for ages so I’m not entirely sure what first drew me to them but that’ll make watching them even more fun.

If you fancy checking out the sci-fi books and films I’ve reviewed before on my blog click here.

Let me know if you are going to take part in Sci-Fi Month, I think it’s going to be a cool experience and I love it when events like this give me the push to finally read or watch something I’ve been meaning to read or watch for ages. Also, let me know what some of your favourite sci-fi books and films are, I’m always looking for recommendations.

Books of 2018

Here are all the books I’ve read this year. This year, to make things interesting, I’ve signed up for a few challenges; these are Beat the Backlist, A to Z Reading and Monthly Motifs and you can find out more about the challenges here. I will also continue to make my way through my Read the World Challenge this year and once again I’ve set my goal to read 50 books and to review at least half of what I read. You can find out more about what I’m reading on my Twitter or Goodreads.

Without further ado, here’s what I’m reading in 2018! Any titles with asterisks are rereads and if it has a link that goes to my review.

January:
Artemis – Andy Weir
City of Clowns – Daniel Alarcón and Sheila Alvarado
So Long a Letter – Mariama Bâ
Gould’s Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish – Richard Flanagan
A Certain Woman – Hala El Badry
Flame in the Mist – Renée Ahdieh

February:
And the Mountains Echoed – Khaled Hosseini
Crazy Rich Asians – Kevin Kwan
Zorro – Isabel Allende
Heidi – Johanna Spyri

March:
All Day at the Movies – Fiona Kidman
– The Knife of Never Letting Go – Patrick Ness
Reading the Ceiling – Dayo Forster
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage – Haruki Murakami
The Hotel Tito – Ivana Bodrožić
– Animal Farm – George Orwell
– The Life and Loves of a He Devil – Graham Norton

April:
The Devils’ Dance – Hamid Ismailov
Raffles: The Amateur Cracksman – E.W. Hornung
– The Ask and the Answer – Patrick Ness
The Nowhere Girls – Amy Reed
Boy: Tales of Childhood – Roald Dahl
– Monsters of Men – Patrick Ness

May:
Othello – William Shakespeare
Queens of Geek – Jen Wilde
One Day I will Write About This Place – Binyavanga Wainaina
Goldfinger – Ian Fleming
Love, Hate and Other Filters – Samira Ahmed

June:
Bleak House – Charles Dickens
I’m Travelling Alone – Samuel Bjork
– The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde – Robert Louis Stevenson
– The City of Brass – S.A. Chakraborty
Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash – Eka Kurniawan
Who Runs the World? – Virginia Bergin
A Thousand Perfect Notes – C.G. Drews
– Nyxia – Scott Reintgen
Kartography – Kamila Shamsie
– I Stop Somewhere – T.E. Carter
– Light Years – Kass Morgan

July:
DeNiro’s Game – Rawi Hage
Smaller and Smaller Circles – F.H. Batacan
The Last Gift – Abdulrazak Gurnah
Summer Is My Favorite Season: A Memoir of Childhood and War in Kosovo – Ilir Berisha
Never Stop Walking: A Memoir of Finding Home Across the World – Christina Rickardsson

August:
– The Princess Diarist – Carrie Fisher
Fish Soup – Margarita García Robayo
The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
Thirty Days – Annelies Verbeke
Negative Space – Luljeta Lleshanaku

September:
La Bastarda – Trifonia Melibea Obono
– Little Women – Louisa May Alcott
– I Capture the the Castle – Dodie Smith
One Would Think The Deep – Claire Zorn
Everything I Never Told You – Celeste Ng
The Murders in the Rue Morgue – Edgar Allan Poe
Tales of Suspense: Hawkeye & the Winter Soldier – Matthew Rosenburg, Travel Foreman, Rachelle Rosenburg

October:
– Be a Sloth – Sarah Ford and Anita Mangan
Jessica Jones Volume 1: Uncaged! – Brian Michael Bendis, Michael Gaydos and Matt Hollingsworth
Fables: Cubs in Toyland – Bill Willingham, Mark Buckingham, Steve Leialoha and Gene Ha
The Power – Naomi Alderman
Lala – Jacek Dehnel
The Yellow Wallpaper – Charlotte Perkins Gilman
The Sad Part Was – Prabda Yoon
1984 – George Orwell
– Then She Was Gone – Lisa Jewell

November:
The Nimrod Flip-Out – Etgar Keret
Dune – Frank Herbert
Multitudes – Lucy Caldwell

December:
The Garden of Evening Mists – Tan Twan Eng
The Fox Was Ever the Hunter – Herta Muller
The Bone Clocks – David Mitchell
Uprooted by Naomi Novik

Currently reading:
???

Books Read: 72/52
Books Reviewed: 55/26

Book titles in italics are just suggestions for now as to what I might read for the challenge – it’s not set it stone.
The A to Z Reading Challenge is to read a book beginning with each letter of the alphabet during the year.
A – Artemis – Andy Weir
B – Boy: Tales of Childhood – Roald Dahl
C – City of Clowns – Daniel Alarcón and Sheila Alvarado
D – The Devils’ Dance – Hamid Ismailov
E – Everything I Never Told You – Celeste Ng
F – Flame in the Mist – Renée Ahdieh
G – Gould’s Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish – Richard Flanagan
H – The Hotel Tito – Ivana Bodrožić
I – I’m Travelling Alone – Samuel Bjork
J – Jessica Jones Volume 1: Uncaged! – Brian Michael Bendis, Michael Gaydos and Matt Hollingsworth
K – Kartography – Kamila Shamsie
L – Love, Hate and Other Filters – Samira Ahmed
M – The Murders in the Rue Morgue – Edgar Allan Poe
N – The Nowhere Girls – Amy Reed
O – Othello – William Shakespeare
P – The Power – Naomi Alderman
Q – Queens of Geek – Jen Wilde
R – Raffles: The Amateur Cracksman – E.W. Hornung
S – Smaller and Smaller Circles – F.H. Batacan
T – The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
U – Uprooted – Naomi Novak
V – Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash – Eka Kurniawan
W – Who Runs the World? – Virginia Bergin
X – Lala – Jacek Dehnel
Y – The Yellow Wallpaper – Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Z – Zorro – Isabel Allende

Book titles in italics are just suggestions for now as to what I might read for the challenge – it’s not set it stone.
The Monthly Motif Challenge is to read a book that fits a set theme each month of 2018.

JANUARY – Diversify Your Reading
Read a book with a character (or written by an author) of a race, religion, or sexual orientation other than your own.
So Long a Letter – Mariama Bâ

FEBRUARY – One Word
Read a book with a one-word title.
Zorro – Isabel Allende

MARCH – Travel the World
Read a book set in a different country than your own, written by an author from another country than your own, or a book in which the characters travel.
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage – Haruki Murakami

APRIL – Read Locally
Read a book set in, or a main character from, your country, state, town, village
Raffles: The Amateur Cracksman – E.W. Hornung

MAY – Book to Screen
Read a book that’s been made into a movie or a TV show.
Goldfinger – Ian Fleming

JUNE – Crack the Case
Mysteries, True Crime, Who Dunnit’s.
I’m Travelling Alone – Samuel Bjork

JULY – Vacation Reads
Read a book you think is a perfect vacation read and tell us why.
A Thousand Perfect Notes – C.G. Drews

AUGUST – Award Winners
Read a book that has won a literary award, or a book written by an author who has been recognized in the bookish community.
Negative Space – Luljeta Lleshanaku

SEPTEMBER – Don’t Turn Out The Light
Cozy mystery ghost stories, paranormal creeptastic, horror novels.
The Murders in the Rue Morgue – Edgar Allan Poe

OCTOBER – New or Old
Choose a new release from 2018 or a book known as a classic.
Nineteen Eighty-Four – George Orwell

NOVEMBER – Family
Books where family dynamics play a big role in the story
Dune – Frank Herbert

DECEMBER – Wrapping It Up
Winter or holiday themed books or books with snow, ice, etc in the title or books set in winter OR read a book with a theme from any of the months in this challenge
The Garden of Evening Mists – Tan Twan Eng

My Reading in 2017 and Goals for 2018

It’s the first week of January so that means it’s time to look back on the reading I did last year. In 2017 I read 70 books (beating my goal of 50) and reviewed 51 of them, beating my goal to review 25 of them – you can find all the books I read here. There were some pretty great ones too, so you can find my top ten books of 2017 here.

I had some other reading-related goals that I mostly completed. I put £1 in a jar for every book I read so I finished the year with £70 to put into my bank account – it’s going towards fun stuff like rent. I also continued with my Read the World Project with 29 of the books I read in 2017 being for that project.

I did want to finish 2017 with 50 books or less on my TBR but that didn’t happen. I started the year with 87 books and finished it with 100. Oops! This was from a combination of subscription boxes and generally poor impulse control when there were deals on either in a bookshop or on Amazon.

Now this wasn’t a goal or anything, but I do like to have a look at who’s writing what I read. I generally aim to have an even split between male and female authors and in 2017 I read slightly more books by women. The 10% both come from a mixture of short story collections and graphic novels.

Now I’m looking towards the future and my reading goals for 2018.

I’m keeping them relatively simple, though this year I’ve signed up for a couple of reading challenges as well to keep me on my toes.

Broadly speaking, I want to read at least 52 books in 2018 and review at least half of them. I’m going to continue to put £1 in a jar for every book I read so I can have a nice bonus at the end of the year again and once again I’m going to say I will try and get my TBR down to 50 books. I think I need to be a bit honest with myself about some of my books, if I don’t think I’m going to read them I need to send them on to a new home, whether that friends or a charity shop. I’d like to also keep a 50/50 split of male and female authors read in 2018, but if I read more books by women I wont be too annoyed. I will also being continuing with my Read the World Project. I’m going to have to be reading more books from around the world this year if I want to complete this task in the next four years – I’ve got about 160 countries left to go!

As I mentioned before I’ve signed up to some reading challenges this year – three of them. They are the Beat the Backlist, where the aim is to read as many of the books sitting on your shelves that were published before 2018, the A to Z Reading Challenge, where you’ve got to read 26 books that start with every letter of the alphabet, and the Monthly Motif Reading Challenge which is to read a book each month that fits the theme set. You can find out more about all these challenges here.

So those are my reading goals for 2018. Do you set yourself yearly reading goals? If you do, I wish you the best of luck and I hope you read some awesome books this year.