Emily Blunt

REVIEW: A Quiet Place (2018)

A family must live in silence to avoid detection from deadly creatures who hunt by sound.

A Quiet Place is incredible. It’s a film that draws you in and your eyes are glued to the screen throughout. It’s tense, scary and thrilling. This family can never let their guard down and as the film progresses, neither can you.

The way sound is used in A Quiet Place is inventive and effective. The daughter (Millicent Simmonds) is deaf and when the camera pans between her and her brother (Noah Jupe) you can hear the difference between the silence she hears, and the ambient noise he can hear. It makes it clear that there’s a difference between silence and quiet and no matter what these people do, if they’re moving around or even breathing heavily, they will be making some noise. And thus, the tension is always there.

The cast is superb – Emily Blunt has a few standout scenes – and it’s noticeable how great they all are because as humans our main form of communication is speech and in this post-apocalyptic world it cannot happen, or these people will die. This cast must show emotion and thought through body language and you can tell exactly how they are all feeling. The family’s main form of communication is sign language, so they do talk to each other, but not in the way the vast majority of us are used to.

That’s the thing about A Quiet Place. It’s a stressful watch but it’s also surprisingly moving. This film is about a family, about parents who will do anything to keep their children safe and the love they have for one another.

A Quiet Place is a fantastic film. It’s terrifying yet emotional and you’ll be on the edge of your seat throughout, but it’s well worth all that. 5/5.

REVIEW: The Jane Austen Book Club (2007)

the-jane-austen-book-clubSix people start a book club to discuss the works of Jane Austen only to find their relationships seem to resemble 21st century versions of her novels.

The group who get together for the book club all have their own problems but they slowly start to find help and comfort from each other. Sylvia’s (Amy Brenneman) husband has just left her so her daughter Allegra (Maggie Grace) has moved in with her, Prudie (Emily Blunt) is a teacher who fancies one of her students, Jocelyn (Maria Bello) has never been in a long-term relationship, Grigg (Hugh Dancy) is the lover of sci-fi and a Jane Austen-virgin, while Bernadette (Kathy Baker) is the most put together out of the whole group. Some of the book group have known each other for years while others are new found friends. It’s the quips and debates between them and the other people in their lives that makes The Jane Austen Book Club enjoyable and funny.

The thing that would probably add another layer of enjoyment to The Jane Austen Book Club is if you have read the six books by Jane Austen that are studied and talked about in the film. Not only would you have your own opinions on what the characters interpret from the books, but you’d probably be able to see how the six protagonist’s relationships mirror the novels a lot more easily. I have only read Pride & Prejudice so while I did enjoy The Jane Austen Book Club, and feel I didn’t miss that much from the overall story, if I’d known the Austen novels there might be some in-jokes and references I would’ve gotten.

The Jane Austen Book Club is a sweet, easy-watch kind of film with some good character dynamics and it’s definitely worth watching if you’re a Jane Austen fan. 3/5.