Gerard Butler

REVIEW: Geostorm (2017)

When a network of satellites designed to control and prevent extreme weather patterns starts to malfunction, it’s a race against the clock for its creator Jake Lawson (Gerard Butler) to figure out what’s going on in the space station, while his younger brother Max (Jim Sturgess) tries to figure out a conspiracy on Earth, before a worldwide Geostorm wipes out everyone and everything on the planet.

Let’s get this out of the way. Depending on your taste in films and your definition of “good” Geostorm isn’t necessarily going to be classed as “good”. However, it is enjoyable. Geostorm is in the same vein as Roland Emmerich’s disaster films like The Day After Tomorrow and 2012, but unlike 2012 which has some truly awful characters that you don’t care about, Geostorm’s cast does well with what they’re given and for the most part portray likeable (yet often cliché) characters with decent chemistry.

The special effects are a bit of a mixed bag. The stuff in space looks great from the various high-tech satellites and rockets to the space station itself, but it’s the extreme weather that doesn’t always looks so great, from tsunami’s to large hail stones to tornadoes, there’s every kind of weather imaginable. It’s when sequence focuses on a character experiencing the disaster like Cheng (Daniel Wu) trying to outdrive molten lava exploding from the streets of Hong Kong, that are tense and exciting. The effects are most noticeable with a tsunami that hits Dubai, especially because the tsunami that hits New York in The Day After Tomorrow, a film released over 10 years earlier, still looks a lot better.

Geostorm is entertaining nonsense. The conspiracy in of why the technology is going wrong and who could be behind it and why, is predictable a lot of the time but the speed of which the reveals and action happen helps you forget about that. It’s the perfect film to watch when you don’t want to think too hard but there’s still some intrigue and some exciting moments. 3/5.

REIVEW: Angel Has Fallen (2019)

When Secret Service Agent Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) is framed for the attempted assassination of President Trumbull (Morgan Freeman) he’s forced to go on the run, avoiding his own agency and the FBI, to uncover the truth and prove his innocence.

If you enjoy the previous films in this somewhat unlikely trilogy about a Secret Service Agent who is really good at killing people and rescuing Presidents, then there’s a good chance you’ll know what you’re getting into with Angel Has Fallen and will like this film too.

In comparison to the previous films in the series, Angel Has Fallen is noticeably less racist as it’s not outside forces that are out to get the President, and Angel Has Fallen attempts to be critical of America’s historic desire for war instead of using other methods when dealing with conflict first. President Trumbull wants to use military force as an absolute final measure in conflict, whereas other people in the White House take a different stance and that causes tension in Trumbull’s cabinet.

Angel Has Fallen is more character driven than the previous films in the series as it delves into Mike’s past and fleshes out his character more. The Mike Banning in Angel Has Fallen is an older, wearier Mike Banning than we’ve seen before. Mike has insomnia, headaches and dizzy spells as everything he’s put his body through over the past few years starts to catch up with him. But even though Mike has a wife and young daughter he loves very much, he doesn’t know how to quit the Secret Service and stop doing what he knows how to do best – killing people and protecting the President.

As Mike has nowhere to turn, he ends up finding his father (Nick Nolte) and their interactions are often very funny as they make a rather odd pair. They have so many similarities that they end up clashing often, and it’s these moments of levity that make the violence more affecting.

The “twists” in Angel Has Fallen are rather obvious and the CGI is notably ropey at times but with a compelling lead and solid action sequences with lots of explosions (the final act is fast-paced and thrilling), it is easy to overlook the flaws in Angel Has Fallen and have a good time with it. 4/5.

REVIEW: Gods of Egypt (2016)

gods-of-egypt-posterMortal Bek (Brenton Thwaites) teams up with the god Horus (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) to try and defeat Set (Gerard Butler), the god of darkness who has taken Egypt’s throne, enslaved its people and plunged the empire into chaos and war.

Gods of Egypt is not a good film. There’s so much wrong with it, the dialogue is awkward and sometimes cheesy, the action scenes are terrible and while it might have a lot of big, shiny things, the CGI can’t really save the film.

Let’s talk about the dialogue. From the first scene with Bek and his girlfriend Zaya (Courtney Eaton) their whole conversation is clunky and is a full-on info dump. From there it doesn’t get much better. There’s some quips when I think were supposed to be humours but not as funny as I found them – they were so cheesy and said at a really inappropriate time.

Then there’s the fight scenes. Some aren’t so bad, and the special effects on the Egyptian gods sometimes looks pretty cool, but then others are just awful. There’s the slow-mo pans around a character as he leaps towards someone, it honestly looks like the actor has been told to hold a couple of fighting poses and the camera, editing and VFX teams will do the rest.

I can’t not mention that a film set in Egypt, about Egyptian gods, has very few people of colour in it – especially black people. I feel like the scene where there’s a hundred Thoth’s (Chadwick Boseman) walking around is some sort of weird attempt to level the playing field.

All in all, Gods of Egypt is a dull and predictable film, though it does manage to sometimes looks pretty and sparkly. 1/5.