Olga Kurylenko

REVIEW: The Princess (2022)

When a strong-willed princess (Joey King) refuses to marry Julius (Dominic Cooper) her cruel suitor, her family is held hostage while she is locked in the tower of her father’s castle. To save her kingdom she must first save herself.

The Princess is one of those simple but fun action films. Its concept has probably been compared to The Raid or Dredd a lot already as instead of someone fighting their way up to the top of a tower, here our heroine is fighting her way down. Because the Princess is used to being underestimated. She was trained by her friend and mentor Linh (Veronica Ngo) in secret so when she wakes up and at the supposed mercy of her captors. She’s not going to wait to be rescued.

The action sequences are well-choreographed and fun as the Princess uses whatever comes to hand to fight before she actually gets her hand on some proper weapons. The lace from her dress or her hair pins become deadly weapons in her hands. She never shies away from an opponent even when so many of them are twice her size and it’s fun to see how she uses her size and speed against them.

The Princess has one of my favourite things in film when it comes to costuming. It’s where a character has one outfit for the entire film but over the course of the film it gets to look different thanks to what the character goes through. Sleeves are ripped off, skirts are caught and torn, various elements are added (some armour) or taken away (dainty shoes swapped for boots) and the evolution of the costume reflects the evolution of the character. With the Princess, she knows who she is and it’s how the costume becomes a reflection of that over time rather than discovering her true self. She wakes up in the tower in a beautiful, long white dress (clearly meant to be her wedding dress) and as she fights for her life it becomes more battered, bloody and well-suited for fighting hordes of mercenaries.

It’s honestly very therapeutic watching an angry young woman absolutely destroy dozens, if not hundreds, of men in her pursuit to save her family and to prevent herself from being forced to marry a sociopath. Sometimes it’s just nice to spend 90 minutes in a fantasy world where women can save the day and be near indestructible as they survive just about anything that could be thrown at them.

The Princess is a decent action film and one with women at its core. Julius’s henchwoman Moira (Olga Kurylenko) is more interesting than him, and the Princesses mother and sister are more rave and layered than her father the king. Then there’s Joey King in the titular role, she’s fierce and brave and fantastic. It is a shame that The Princess is one of the many 20th Century Fox films that has seemed to have been dumped on streaming services rather than get a cinema release since Disney bought the studio as it’se definitely one of those films that’d work well with a crowd. 3/5.

REVIEW: Johnny English Strikes Again (2018)

When all the identities of MI7 Agents are revealed in a cyber-attack, the government is forced to recall retied agent Johnny English (Rowan Atkinson), who is the only agent left that might be able to find the hacker.

This is the third Johnny English film and to be honest I have a bit of a soft spot for the series, mainly because of the memories I have of who I was with when I saw each film.

The plot is simple, future events are signposted incredibly obviously, and the villain is so obvious it’s almost painful, but a convoluted plot is not what you get with these movies. There is fun to be had though – a virtual-reality-induced escapade across London is innovative and funny.

It’s Rowan Atkinson’s physical humour that is the best thing about this film and the character, it’s just a shame there wasn’t more of it. there’s a scene where English has taken some adrenalin drugs and Atkinson’s body movements, alongside the different songs playing was brilliant. English’s incompetence that verges on accidentally brilliance is charming albeit predictable, but Atkinson makes it fun.

Johnny English Strikes Again is family fun for all ages. The showing at the cinema I was at had grandparents with young grandkids, and people of all ages between. It’s nice to watch a film that’s silly and fun without violence and sex-references (thankfully the mysterious Ophelia played by Olga Kurylenko is not set up as a love interest at all) and it’s an easy-watch with its less than 90 minutes runtime. 3/5.

REVIEW: Quantum of Solace (2008)

quantum_of_solace_ver4_xlgJames Bond (Daniel Craig) is on the hunt for revenge as he tries to stop the mysterious organisation Quantum from eliminating a countries most valuable resource.

Quantum of Solace is a direct sequel to Casino Royale (2006) it starts almost moments after Casino Royale ends and has a lot of the same characters and themes running through it. I definitely think you get more from Quantum of Solace if you watch it straight after Casino Royale as they work like one big story.

From interrogating Mr. White (Jesper Christensen) Bond, M (Judi Dench) and Bill Tanner (Rory Kinnear) learn about the far-reaching organisation Quantum and Bond goes on the hunt for answers. His search leads him to industrialist Dominic Greene (Mathieu Amalric) who seems to have many connections with dodgy military figures and with Quantum. When his search begins, Bond meets Camille (Olga Kurylenko) who is also out for revenge and while they may not trust each other to start with, they end up working together. Camille is great, she has a tragic backstory and is determined and resourceful and isn’t impressed by Bond. I love competent Bond girls and Camille is definitely one of the best.

A lot of the relationships between characters are expanded on in Quantum of Solace. You see how M does (generally) trust Bond to do the right thing, even if he does cause chaos, and Felix Leiter (Jeffery Wright) appears again and you see the respect he and James have for each other even though they are technically working on different sides in Quantum of Solace.

The memorable action sequences in Quantum of Solace for me was a boat chase in which Camille shows she doesn’t need saving, and the aerial dogfight (which again Camille is pretty great in) and the finale in the desert. Both Camille and Bond each have their own Bad Guys to face in the finale and the way the sequence is shot means it very tense and dramatic but not overly so.

Quantum of Solace continues to balance the emotional beats with great action, plot and characters and has a great yet understated Bond Girl in Camille. 4/5.

When I first watched Quantum of Solace years ago, I didn’t really get it as it was almost a direct sequel to Casino Royale which I hadn’t watched before – now watching them both in the right order, I enjoyed them a lot more.