Regina Hall

REVIEW: Support the Girls (2018)

Lisa (Regina Hall) is the general manager at a Texas highway-side sports bar and grill where the waitresses wear short shorts and crop tops. Lisa’s endless optimism and her faith in her girls, her customers and herself is tested over the course of one long, strange day.

Support the Girls is a very funny workplace dramatic-comedy. The majority of the film is set in the bar as Lisa puts new waitresses through their paces with Maci, one of the current waitresses, (Haley Lu Richardson) giving them lots of advice. Danyelle (Shayna McHayle) is another old-hand at the job and her dry wit balances out Maci’s bubbliness perfectly. Maci could quiet easily be an annoying character with her enthusiasm and optimism, but Richardson’s performance makes her endearing.

For a 90-minute film it does such a great job of fleshing out these characters, both Lisa, her co-worker’s, and their customers. There’s so many little moments or throwaway lines where you get a glimpse of these people’s lives. There are a few sub-plots that slowly grow over the course of the film, and others that are only hinted at, making Support the Girls truly feel like a slice-of-life kind of film. Really, the script is brilliant with so many conversations sounding so realistic, it’s hard to believe it’s not improvised.

Regina Hall is brilliant as Lisa, she’s funny, caring, but she’s also trying to keep her own life in control as well. Lisa’s relationship with her staff is almost like a mother-figure, she helps them sort out childcare, gives relationship advice, and is generally always there for them to talk to. Pretty much everything that can go wrong, does go wrong for Lisa, but it’s how she keeps moving forward that makes her such a compelling character.

Support the Girls is funny, sweet and heart-warming. It’s about the friendship and camaraderie between women and, to a lesser extent, anyone who works in hospitality. It’s a feel-good film and the central performances and chemistry between Hall, Richardson and McHayle are wonderful to watch. 4/5.

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REVIEW: The Hate U Give (2018)

Starr (Amanda Stenberg) has two lives, one in her poor black neighbourhood and one in her affluent, predominately white private school. Those two lives come crashing down when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil (Algee Smith) by a police officer, and Starr must find her voice and stand up for what’s right.

The Hate U Give is a fantastic film. It’s about so many real-world problems affecting black people. It talks about race, discrimination, poverty, drugs and violence. Starr lives in a neighbourhood where there’s so many open and warm people, but there’s also the gang led by King (Anthony Mackie) that is a constant threatening presence in everyone’s lives. Starr describes herself as two people, Starr Version One is who she is at home, when she’s with her family and her people, Starr Version Two is who she is at school, where she doesn’t use any slang and doesn’t cause a fuss.

Amandla Stenberg is fantastic at showing the different sides of Starr, how they conflict and how over the cause of the investigation into Khalil’s death she learns to find her voice and be her true self. Starr is more of a watcher to begin with, standing in the corner at parties and just watching how events unfold. More things, often horrible things, happen to her than her being proactive, but as the fear and pressure mounts, she starts to choose to react to what she’s seen and it’s all the more powerful when she does.

Stenberg carries the film brilliantly, but she’s also surrounded by a great cast, the majority of which give nuanced performances. Russell Hornsby and Regina Hall play Starr’s parents Maverick and Lisa, who each want the best for Starr and their family as a whole but that translates into different things. Lisa wants to protect her family, ideally moving them out of the neighbourhood to somewhere safer, while Maverick says this is their home and encourages Starr to speak out and do what she thinks is right. They are both incredibly loving parents and any scenes with Starr and her family can go from being sweet and funny one moment, to them all suddenly being under threat.

Besides from being a film with an important message, The Hate U Give also shows the life of a modern teenage girl to great effect. Starr and her friends have Tumblr’s, they have different tastes in music, and when friendships become strained Starr must weigh up the positives and the negatives to see if this relationship she wants to fight for. It’s the little things, Starr’s love of The Fresh Prince and how she and her friends used to play at being Harry Potter makes her a relatable modern teenager.

The Hate U Give is a heart-breaking and powerful film, but at its heart there is a strength to it and so much heart. It will make you cry but it will also make you laugh. It balances so many different elements but with an assured direction from George Tillman Jr. and Amandla Stenberg’s phenomenal lead performance, The Hate U Give is an incredible film that will stand the test of time. 5/5.

I read, loved and reviewed The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas last year, you can find that review here.