romantic comedy

I is for Imagine Me & You (2005)

When Rachel (Piper Perabo) catches florist Luce’s (Lena Headey) eye at her wedding to Heck (Matthew Goode) she instantly feels things she’s never felt before, questioning her sexuality and prompting a stir among Rachel’s family and friends.

Imagine Me & You is a very funny and entertaining rom com. It follows a lot of the usual tropes of the genre, but the fact it’s about two women falling in love make it feel fresher and more exciting.

Nobody is really made the villain in Imagine Me & You because love is complicated. Rachel loves Heck, and though what she’s suddenly feeling for Luce is unlike anything she’s felt before, it doesn’t make the love she felt for Heck meaningless. Imagine Me & You really handles the discussions of love, whether it’s something that builds or it can be instantaneous, very well and doesn’t make one relationship lesser to build up another.

The chemistry between Perabo and Headey is palpable and Perabo is especially brilliant showing Rachel’s confusion and heartache as she tries to figure out what she’s feeling for Luce while feeling guilty for feeling anything at all.

The extended cast are wonderful too. Celia Imrie and Anthony Head who Rachel’s parents and Sue Johnston who plays Luce’s mum, really highlighting the wonderful British cast this film has. They all have very funny lines and their relationships with their on-screen daughters is brilliant and feels real.

Imagine Me & You is a funny and sweet romantic comedy and it has one of the best declarations of love I’ve seen in a romcom – or any genre of film to be honest. 5/5.

REVIEW: The Knight Before Christmas (2019)

When medieval English knight Sir Cole (Josh Whitehouse) is magically transported to present day Ohio, he meets high school science teacher Brooke (Vanessa Hudgens) and together they must figure out how he can complete his quest in order to return home.

The Knight Before Christmas is one of those Christmas films that is most definitely not good, but at times it can be weirdly watchable and that’s mostly down to the charm of Vanessa Hudgens.

The Knight Before Christmas is a classic fish out of water tale. Being a medieval knight Cole knows nothing about anything from technology to food and everything in between. This leads to what are supposed to be funny moments – sometimes they are, sometimes they aren’t. After Brooke hits Cole with her car she takes him in as she feels bad and it’s obvious that he’s lost his memory what with him having old fashioned speech patterns and believing he’s a fourteenth century knight and all.

You do have to give Netflix kudos for having a character in The Knight Before Christmas sitting down and watching another one of the Christmas films. I guess it makes sense in terms of costs and the legalities but it’s still kind of funny. I’m pretty sure they namedropped a fictional country that features in another of their Christmas films too. Does this mean that there’s a Netflix Christmas Film Cinematic Universe?

The close relationship between Brooke and her sister Madison (Emmanuelle Chriqui) is nice and they feel like believable siblings without Madison being solely relegated to the supportive family member. Hudgens and Whitehouse don’t have a lot of chemistry but they’re not terrible together. As Cole and Brooke slowly begin to understand and care for one another you can’t help but wish they’d realise how they feel a lot sooner – but then where would be the drama and “suspense”?!

The Knight Before Christmas is cheesy predictable Christmas nonsense. It’s harmless but forgettable but Vanessa Hudgens’s charm and big doe eyes save it from being awful. 2/5.

REVIEW: Let It Snow (2019)

When a snowstorm hits a small town on Christmas Eve, a group of high school seniors finds their friendships and love lives unexpectedly colliding.

Let It Snow is Netflix’s latest foray into YA book adaptations. The book with the same name was written by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle and was three interconnected stories about teenagers finding romance in the snow. I can’t comment on how it was as an adaptation as I haven’t read the source material, but as a film it was really good.

The young cast are so great in their roles that it’s very easy to be charmed by them and quickly get invested in their relationships. There’s Julie (Isabela Moner) who accidentally runs into pop star Stuart (Shameik Moore), there’s Tobin (Mitchell Hope) who finally plucks up the courage to tell his best friend Angie (Kiernan Shipka) how he feels about her when JP (Matthew Noszka) comes into their lives, and Dorrie (Liv Hewson) is not only head over heels for a cheerleader but she’s also getting frustrated with her best friend Addie (Odeya Rush) who doesn’t see how great she is. There are even more characters than that and different relationships and friendships but those are the main ones that run through the film.

The relationship between Julie and Stuart could’ve felt very instalove but thanks to Moner and Moore’s great chemistry it doesn’t, and you find yourself rooting for these two very different people meet and form an unlikely connection.

While Let It Snow does follow a lot of the usual romance or teen movie tropes, it does have a different take on a couple. JP, for instance, is supposed to be the guy you hate as he’s getting in the way of a potential romance between Tobin and Angie, but because he’s such a nice guy (but not a Nice Guy™) you don’t, and neither does Tobin. It’s also lovely to see the friendship between two teenage girls getting such prominence and the two of them trying to help one another even when the truth hurts.

The film does a good job at juggling all the storylines and interweaving them and the characters in a way that feels natural. One storyline never feels like it’s getting more attention than another and having the film take place over one day is great as it’s like peaking through a window into these characters lives.

Let It Snow is just so sweet and fluffy! It’s the right balance of funny and sad, and with its snowy setting, which does look like a picture-postcard, Let It Snow feels like a warm Christmassy hug – which is exactly what you want from a Christmas movie. 4/5.

REVIEW: Always Be My Maybe (2019)

Best friends in their childhood, Sasha (Ali Wong) and Marcus (Randall Park) ended up drifting a part, even though everyone always thought they’d end up together. When they reconnect sixteen years later, maybe this is their second chance?

Always Be My Maybe is a romantic comedy that captures the best friends to lovers trope perfectly. The road going from best friends to lovers is never smooth thanks to the fear of ruining a friendship, the fear of opening up your heart, and just the general awkwardness of becoming more than friends with your best mate. Having the two leads have great chemistry and give great performances makes you feel for both of them in this scenario.

Sasha has become a celebrity chef, travelling across the country to open restaurants in different cities. It’s as she returns to her hometown of San Francisco to open her latest restaurant that she runs into Marcus. Marcus is almost the complete opposite of Sasha. He’s stayed in San Francisco, he works for his dad’s business and he still performs in the same band but never tries to take the band to the next level. It’s equal parts awkward and endearing, seeing the two of the reconnect and try to find some middle ground after so long a part and lives that have gone in different directions.

The supporting cast are great too. Michelle Buteau plays Veronica, Sasha’s friend and PA, and she probably has all the best lines, while there is Keanu Reeves playing an over the top version of Keanu Reeves – or at least what we think Keanu Reeves would be like – who steals every scene he’s in.

As a romantic comedy Always Be My Maybe is sometimes uniquely Asian-American. For instance, Sasha cooks Asian cuisine, and there’s lots of discussions of different dishes and her and Marcus’s parents encompass Asian stereotypes without them becoming one-dimensional characters. But Always Be My Maybe proves that love, fear, and aspirations are all universal while still being very funny.

Always Be My Maybe doesn’t reinvent the rom-com wheel but it’s sweet, funny and with its charming leads it’s near perfect. 4/5.

REVIEW: Someone Great (2019)

When Jenny (Gina Rodriguez) and Nate (LaKeith Stanfield) break up after nine years, a week before she’s set to move across the country for work, she’s determine to enjoy one last NYC adventure with her two best friends Erin (DeWanda Wise) and Blair (Brittany Snow).

Someone Great is like a love letter to the friendship between women. Jenny, Erin and Blair have been best friends for years and the way they interact feels like such a real relationship. They’re at different points in their lives both in terms of work, romance, and responsibilities but they all have fears about growing up and how they might not have reached their goals. Erin is a lesbian and scared of commitment and putting labels on her relationship with Leah (Rebecca Naomi Jones), Blair is in a relationship with a guy who annoys her and Jenny has just got her dream job that she’s worked so hard for but getting the job is the catalyst for the end of her relationship. But no matter what is going on in their lives, they are there for one another to listen, to make each other laugh, and to try and make things better.

Besides the wonderful relationship between the women, the honest portrayal of romantic relationships is great too. Sometimes you grow apart and don’t love the other person, but you don’t hate them either. Other times it can hurt as you still love them, but you know you’ve grown up into a different person to the one you were when you got together. Relationships evolve and they don’t always work forever, and it can be heart-breaking but there can also be someone there to help you through it.

The trio of female leads have great chemistry but the chemistry between Rodriguez and Stanfield really stands out. The way their relationship is told through flashbacks, as Jenny hears songs that reminds her of different times, is great as you can see the ups and downs but it’s bittersweet as you also see how young and happy they were.

Someone Great is funny, sweet and touching as it shows the realities of growing up and growing apart. The soundtrack is fab and every element of it is balanced so well; the humour, the drama, the characters, the relationships – it all comes together in a surprisingly heart-breaking yet heart-warming romantic comedy with a twist. 5/5.

REVIEW: Isn’t It Romantic (2019)

After a mugging goes wrong, Natalie (Rebel Wilson), who is disenchanted with love, finds herself trapped inside a romantic comedy.

Isn’t It Romantic is absolutely delightful. It clearly states all the typical rom-com clichés at the beginning when Natalie is being rather cynical about the genre, and then once it becomes a rom-com, it has so much fun with those clichés. It treads the fine line of poking fun at those clichés but still embracing them when the right moment comes.

Rebel Wilson is great as Natalie, she’s charming and funny and has great chemistry with all of her co-stars. When Natalie wakes up in her rom-com life, Blake (Liam Hemsworth) who had previously not known she existed, can’t take his eyes off of her. Hemsworth looks to be having a lot of fun being a typically hot yet potentially self-centred love interest while Adam Devine’s Josh does well of not falling into the nice guy/friendzone trap. Josh and Natalie are best friends, and believable ones at that, and their friendship is so sweet and Josh never acts like Natalie owes him anything which is great.

The soundtrack is full of so many great throwbacks to rom-com movies. The way Vanessa Carlton’s “A Thousand Miles” is used is pure brilliance and there’s so many other songs that reference other rom-com movies, in many ways Isn’t It Romantic is like a love letter to the genre.

The fun thing about Isn’t It Romantic, is that while it follows the typical story framings of a romantic comedy, it also has a feel-good message about loving yourself and being happy. Isn’t It Romantic is sweet, funny and it’s a film that leaves you with a big grin on your face. It’s a great way to spend 90 minutes and it’s the right balance of fluffy and satirical. 4/5.

REVIEW: Crazy Rich Asians (2018)

Rachel (Constance Wu) and Nick (Henry Golding) have been dating for over a year, and when it’s Nick’s best friend Colin’s (Chris Pang) wedding in Singapore, it’s the perfect chance for Rachel to meet Nick’s family and friends – what she doesn’t expect is for them all to be super rich and famous!

Based on the book of the same name by Kevin Kwan, Crazy Rich Asians is a romantic comedy that’s big, bright and full of over the top characters and settings, and somehow it all works.

Singapore with all its people, buildings and food looks stunning. The film captures the extravagance of these characters lives, showing all the glitz and glamour but still being able to shine light, however briefly, on the characters more hidden sides – one of Nick’s cousins Astrid (Gemma Chan) has a subplot with her dissatisfied husband (Pierre Png) that’s heart-breaking.

Rachel and Nick are a believable couple as their chemistry is fantastic and they actually talk about the problems they encounter – though both of them don’t always understand what the other could face because of their relationship. Rachel’s main adversary is Eleanor (Michelle Yeoh), Nick’s glamourous and reserved mother. She wants the best for her son and see’s Rachel as an outsider and a distraction, both because of Rachel’s status in class, and the fact she grew up in America. As Eleanor’s disapproval becomes more obvious, Rachel must decide whether to fight or give in to the almost insurmountable pressures she and Nick are under. While Eleanor is the villain to Rachel’s hero, the film never fully villainises her, instead being sure to show Eleanor’s side to things and making her sympathetic in her own way.

The whole cast is brilliant and while the romance is the main focus, the film showcases some brilliant relationships between women. There’s Rachel and her best friend from university Peik Lin (Awkwafina) who is hilarious and supportive, Astrid is one of the few members of her family to fully accept and like Rachel straight away, and Rachel and mother (Kheng Hua Tan) have one of the best mother-daughter relationships, and while her mother is from China, even she doesn’t quite get all the ins and outs of high Singapore society.

Crazy Rich Asians is a funny, romantic film with engaging characters you root for. Everything works, the opulence, the music and the cast. It’s a delightful film that’s pure escapism and there’s nothing wrong with that. 5/5.

You can read my review of the book here.

REVIEW: About Time (2013)

When Tim (Domhnall Gleeson) turns 21, his father (Bill Nighy) tells him the family secret – all men in their family can travel back in time. Tim learns that changing events in his life isn’t as easy as you might think, especially when he uses it to find love.

About Time is a charming and funny romantic drama. It blends together the science-fiction of time travel with all the best stuff about love and family. While it is funny, About Time is also incredibly sincere – it’s definitely the kind of film you should embrace wholeheartedly and leave any cynicism you may have behind.

When Tim meets Mary (Rachel McAdams) things go awry when he uses his time travel skills. Slowly he begins to realise that changes to his past have consequences and it can be tough keeping track of it all. The way the relationship between Tim and Mary develops is really sweet. There is the potential for it to be a bit creepy, what with Tim learning more about Mary each time he might time travel but to her it’s a first encounter, but the chemistry between Gleeson and McAdams and a heartfelt script makes it Tim’s awkwardness more endearing than sinister.

While the main focus of Tim’s story is about his romance with Mary, About Time is also about family. Tim adores his sister Kit Kat (Lydia Wilson), their relationship is just the best and he always tries to help her, with and without time travel, though it doesn’t always work out. And then there’s Tim and his dad – these two have one of the most touching, and realistic, father-son relationship I’ve seen in a while.

There are some issues with About Time. It’s perhaps a little long with the middle dragging slightly and some may find it too sentimental, but all in all it’s a beautiful film. About Time is funny and romantic and shows off all the highs and lows of what life truly is. Yes, Tim may have time travel to help him out now and again, but it’s much better to take the time to experience life in that moment. 4/5.

REVIEW: Love, Simon (2018)

Simon Spier (Nick Robinson) has a huge secret, he’s not told his friends, family, or anyone at school: he’s gay. Simon finds someone to talk to through anonymous emails, but when someone discovers his secret and threatens to expose him, Simon must face everyone and come to terms with how he feels.

Nick Robinson is great as Simon, he’s charming and likeable and you feel his heartache. Simon’s friends are all pretty great too and they all feel like a real group of friends. They fall-out and are sometimes selfish, but they also care about one another.

Not only are the teen cast brilliant, so are the adults in supporting roles. Ms Albright (Natasha Rothwell), the drama teacher, is hilarious and steals every scene she’s in, while Vice-Principal Mr Worth (Tony Hale) is equal parts funny and cringey. Jennifer Garner and Josh Duhamel play Simon’s parents and they are some of the best parents in a teen movie in a long time. They feel like normal parents and their relationship with Simon is wonderful.

Love, Simon has all the makings of a classic, teen rom-com. It’s very funny, it’s touching, and it’s has so many great characters. It’s a coming of age story that pulls you in and you can fully empathise with Simon and his friends, no matter how old you or how long it’s been since you were a high school student yourself. Love, Simon manages to be persistently funny, even when it’s handling the more dramatic and sad moments. It balances all these emotions perfectly and the soundtrack’s fantastic too.

Love, Simon is brilliant. I laughed, I cried, and I can’t wait to see it again. 5/5.